Voice of the common citizen

Urban Vaastu introduces a series of comments, reflecting the voice of the common Indian on Urbanisation. No Urbanisation is complete until the average individual gets a chance to witness the feel of the good happening.
Let’s see what a few of our readers have to tell us:

MIHIR PATEL, STUDENT, MASTERS IN URBAN MANAGEMENT, CEPT UNIVERSITY, AHMEDABAD:

The government is implementing schemes which are aimed towards the development of the nation and to create awareness among the public. The campaigns and the celebrity endorsement for related ads help to create an impact and leads to a more positive implementation of these schemes.
With the celebrities also signing up for ads such as Swachh Bharat, Beti Bachao Beti Padhao Abhiyan and many more, the awareness is sure to reach greater heights.

R. SRINIVAS, HEAD, METROPOLITAN AND UNION TERRITORIES DIVISION:

Urbanisation is a process of spatial accretion whereby it brings in the transformation of built up spaces and provides for enhanced employment opportunities and facilitates the economic development and contributes to the national economy.
Of course, the urbanisation process has both positive and negative implications and the task of urban planners is to ensure and create a balance between built and the natural environment and to strive for balance and inclusive development.

ABHYUDAY TIWARI, MANAGER, MCLEOD RUSSEL INDIA LTD, ASSAM:

Northeast India has faced major urbanisation so far, no doubt. But somewhere there is still a lot of scope for improvement and better schemes to be accommodated.
Known for its peacefulness and greenery, the region attracts tourists; development of roads as well as easy access of rail and air services would make this place more easily accessible.

REKHA VYAS, HOUSEWIFE, HYDERABAD:

Urbanisation is a disguise to mankind of the 21st century. It is good to hear that the world has now become a “global village” due to rapid globalisation and urbanisation.
But this exponential growth in urbanisation comes with a bunch of ill effects. Urbanisation comes with a growth in cities, which leads to expansion of land causing deforestation and clearing of homes to many species.
The expanded city also adds to pollution causing the earth’s temperature to rise. Also, urbanisation has led to reduced physical activity and unhealthy nutrition.
The World Health Organisation predicts that by 2020, non-communicable diseases such as heart disease will account for 69 percent of all deaths in developing countries. This eventually effects the rapidly growing population to hunt for jobs and may increase the crime rates as well.